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Full text of "Camp Lejeune vs. No. Carolina Pre-Flight"

CAMP LEJEUNE vs. NO. CAROLINA PRE-FLIGHT 



TWENTY-FIVE 
CENTS 



Mntro ducing f Ii c Maii « first 
I cm n cl - lici seci bomber 



1 . PV-l— That's the U. S. Navy's name for the 
Vega Ventura. It's a nautical version of the 
smashing new twin-engine bomber that is mak- 
ing a flaming Hell out of German industrial 
centers in almost daily R.A. F. raids. These 
deep-bellied Navy PV-l's strike at sea. They 
swoop in low from the sky with torpedoes for 
marauding surface craft or "ash can" depth 
charges for sub-busting. 




2. Operating from land bases, the PV-l is the 
first Navy bomber of its type to tackle the job 
of clearing Allied shipping lanes so that pre- 
cious supplies may go through. Airfields on 
small island outposts are big enough for PV-l's, 
and droppable fuel tanks give the planes effec- 
tive range to blast the enemy. They are proving 



to be one of the answers to the important 
problem of licking enemy submarines. 




3. Like the Ventura it is versatile— capable of 
many jobs. Although designed primarily for 
bombing, its 4000 h.p. also can be useful for tow- 
ing targets for fast fighter plane practice, or 
for hauling troop-laden gliders. 




4. Bigger, faster, and able to carry a larger load 
than the Lockheed Hudson, which they closely 
resemble, the PV-l and the Vega Ventura re- 
tain the same qualities of dependability. Sin- 
gle spar wing construction, 100% X-Ray of 
all stress parts and ruggedness of design are 



the qualities of stamina that permit these 
planes to go through so much — yet bring the 
crews home safely. 

ALL FIRST CLASS MAIL 

Lockheed P-3S Vega Ventura 

Lightning Medium 
Fighter BY AIR — IT'S COM I NG 1 Bomber 



A subsidiary of Lockheed 

Aircraft Corporation 

Copyright, 1943, Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, 
Vega Aircraft Corporation, Burbank, California. 
Member Aircraft War Production Council, Inc. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Vice Admiral John Sidney McCain . . . 3 

Captain Frank T. Ward 4 

Lt. Commander Frank H. Wickhorst 5 

"A Switch in Lullabies," by Grantland Rice 6 

U. S. Navy Flyers 9 

The Naval Aviation Cadet Training Program.. 11 

The Naval Aviation Cadet Selection Board 12-13 

Tarmac Training 14 

Naval Flight Preparatory Schools .15-17 

C.A.A. War Training Service Schools 18-20 

Georgia Pre-Flight School 22-24 

No. Carolina Pre-Flight School 26-29 

Brigadier General Henry L. Larson, U.S.M.C. . . 30 

Statistics of Camp Lejeune Squad 31 

Statistics of No. Carolina Pre-Flight 34 

Starting Lineups 35 

Rival Coaches and Athletic Directors 38 

Del Monte Pre-Flight School 40.42 

Iowa Pre-Flight School " 44.46 

St. Mary's Pre-Flight School 47.49 

Bill Leiser's Letter to his Nephew . 50-51 

Primary Training ° 52-54 

Lighter-Than-Air Training 55^57 

Intermediate Training 58-60 

Operational Training .61-62-64 

Camp LeJeune 
vs. 

No. Carolina Pre-Flight School 
Kenan Stadium 
Chapel Hill, No. Carolina 
Nov. 13, 1943 

This program is published by the Athletic Associations 
of the five V. S. Navy Pre-Flight Schools and is printed 
under the direction of the Pre-Flight Section of the 
Aviation Training Division in the Office of the Chief 
of Naval Operations. 



aft 




"/ wiir 

The following was found on the flyleaf of the diary of 
an Iowa boy who fell at Chateau-Thierry in 191 8: 



"America must win this war. 
Therefore / will work; / will 
save; / will sacrifice; I will en- 
dure; / will fight cheerfully and 
do my utmost, as if the issue of the 
whole struggle depended on me alone" 

'as if the issue of the whole struggle depended on me alone 



THE B<5 CORPORATION 



NEW YORK 




Pi 




V1C& ADMIRAL JOHN SIDNEY McCAIN, USN 
Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air) 



Vice Admiral McCain former- 
ly was Chief of the Navy's 
Bureau -of- Aeronautics. A 
Naval Aviator, his wide expe- 
rience includes command of 
an aircraft carrier, command 
of a Naval Air Station, and 
service on battleships and 
cruisers. * He wears the Dis- 
tinguished Service Medal, pre- 
sented by the President for 
exceptionally meritorious serv- 
ice in the Solomon Islands 
Campaign. 





FRANK H. 
WICKHORST, USNR, is Head of the 
Pre-Flight Section of the Aviation 
Training Division in the Office of 
the Chief of Naval Operations. As 
such,' in addition to his duties per- 
taining to the Pre-Flight Schools, he 
is responsible for making recom- 
mendations pertaining to physical 
training in all phases of Naval 
Aviation. 



A SWITCH IN LULLABIES 

By GRANTLAND RICE 

"Some flew east — some flew west — 
Some flew over the cuckoo's nest." 

— (Old nursery rhyme) 





Somewhere beyond the Southern Cross above the Seven Seas, 
Along the bitter far-off roads, their pinions catch the breeze. 
Their wings are black against the sky, by desert, surf and dune, 
An ancient lullaby is lost against a rougher tune — 

Some flew east — some flew west — 

And some will fly no more, 

Far, far out from the eagle's nest 

Their mighty motors roar. 

And wing by wing their rule will grow 

Above all sea and sod, 

Until they strike the final blow 

For Country and for God. 

Faintly, I hear the old, old song when golden dreams were young. 
But louder still I hear the wings where sudden death is flung. 
Bravely the eagle rides the air, but in my fading dreams, 
The dim, lost lullaby returns— how far away it seems— 

Some fly east — and some fly west — 

They take an endless track. 

Through flame and steel they face the test 

Around the world and back. 

Their golden youth blots out the sky, 

They let the comets plod. 

As each one flies to live or die 

For country and for God. 



Song of Elmer . . . 
the pilot who never gets tired 



He holds no place in the Officer's Mess 1 
for he does not sleop or eat, 

He's the Quietest Birdman ever took 
his place in a cockpit seat — 

He joins no laughter, nor shoots the breeze, 
nor whistles, nor hums, nor sings, 

But he's flown more planes than any man 
who ever wore pilot's wings . . . 

. . . has Elmer! 




He's an old, old hand, as old hands go 
in a young man's game today, 

For he circled the globe in 'Thirty-three 
with Post in the Winnie Mae — 

He's an Army man, he's a Navy man, 
and he flies with the R.A.F., 

And the Yankees say, and the British say 
of pilots, he's the best . . . 

. . . is Elmer! 




Often when bombers have levelled off 
for the last tense bombing runs, 



And the bomb-bay doors are opened wide, 
and the gunners man the guns, 

When the flak comes up as the bombs 
go down, and the target zone is clear, 

Then who is the pilot who holds the course 
set by the bombardier . . . ? 

It's Elmer! 




He can hold a plane on a chosen course 
while the crewmen rest or sleep, 

He can level off for a landing glide, 
or bank her sharp and steep — 

He can spiral up, he can spiral down, 
or hold her level and true — 

His hydraulic muscles never tire 
the way human muscles do . . . 

. . . not Elmer's! 




And so bombing, transport, and cargo 
planes, take Elmer on every flight 

To spare the pilot and rest the crew 
for emergency, storm, or fight- 



He needs no rest, for he never gets tired, 
being only a cold machine, 

Just wheels and wires and gears and cogs, 
with brackets and stuff between — 

...is Elmer! 




He wears no medals, he holds no rank. 
Why should he? He cannot feel 

The courage that flares in time of need 
for he's only alloy and steel! 

So when nerve is needed, the bombardier, 
the pilots, the gunners, too, 

The navigator, and all the rest, 

are the boys who pull her through . . . 

...NOT Elmer! 



SPERRY 

GYROSCOPE COMPANY, INC. 

is proud to be manufacturing the 
famous Sperry Gyropilot for the 
Armed Forces of the United 
Nations. 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Division of Sperry Corporation 



• Reprints of this poem — suitable for 
framing, with signature removed— may 
be obtained without charge by writing 
the Sperry Gyroscope Company. 



7 



Copyright 1943 — Philco Corporation 



ONE of the factors that 
qualified Philco so well 
for the battle of production was 
its background of research and 
development in the field of tele- 
vision. For fifteen years before 
the war, Philco engineers had 
devoted millions of dollars to the progress of the science 
of television. Their pioneer developments for improv- 
ing the clarity, sharpness and detail of the television 
picture have today become the accepted standards of the 
industry. The Philco television station in Philadelphia, 
too, has been a rich laboratory of experience for the 
advance of the principles of television transmission. 



C. G. Werner makes this contribution to the se- 
ries being drawn for Philco by America's leading 
editorial cartoonists depicting the significance of 
America's productive might. While available, a 
full size reproduction of the original drawing 
will be sent, free, on request to Philco Corpora- 
tion, Philadelphia, Pa. Ask for Cartoon No. 55NA. 



So Philco brought to the 
battle of production more than 
its manufacturing skill and 
experience as the world's larg- 
est radio manufacturer. Its 
scientists, laboratories and 
years of radio and television 
research were ready to serve the nation at war. Today, 
Philco engineers are at work night and day on urgent 
and vital projects in the realm of research and devel- 
opment work in the field of electronics. With the dawn 
of peace, their contributions to Victory will usher in a 
new age of comfort, convenience and entertainment 
for the homes of America. 



PHILCO CORPO RAT I O N 




Philco Men and 
Women are among 
the first to fly the 
Army-Navy "E" 
Flag with White Star 



OUR WAR PRODUCTION PLEDGE: 
MORE . BETTER • SOONER 



RADIOS, PHONOGRAPHS, REFRIGERATORS, 
AIR CONDITIONERS, RADIO TUBES AND 
PARTS * * INDUSTRIAL STORAGE BATTERIES 



BUY WAR BONOS ANO STAMPS 



LISTEN TO 
"OUR SECRET WEAPON" 

Hear Rex Stoul expose Axis lies 
and propaganda over your Colum- 
bia station every Friday evening. 
See your local newspaper for 
time and station. Hear the Truth! 



8 



1 

I 




V. S. Patent Office by U. S. Navy 



made expressly for 

NAVAL AVIATION CADETS AND OFFICERS 



Qshkosh Trunks & Luggage 



10 



THE NAVAL AVIATION CADET TRAINING PROGRAM — 1943 



The Naval Aviation Cadet Training Program, designed 
to produce fighting flying officers in the Navy and Ma- 
rine Corps is similar throughout most of its stages in that 
the training may be divided broadly into the following 
categories: 

I. Flight; 2. Ground School; 3. Military; A. Physical 
Training. Alike in these general aspects, the program 
differs in its various stages. 

lhere is no actual flying in tarmac training, at the 
Flight Preparatory Schools or at the Pre-Flight Schools. 
With the exception of flight at these three stages, the 
four general categories listed above obtain throughout 
the cadet training program. 

All cadets take the same training until they complete 
Pre-Flight School. At that time the majority of cadets 
goes into heavier-than-air training, bur a sizable number 
applies and is selected for lighter-than-air training. 

If a cadet is training to fly planes, he goes first to 
primary, then to intermediate (where he wins his wings) 
and finally to operational training. If the cadet is 
training to fly blimps he takes primary, then advanced and 
finally operational training. The heavier-than-air training 
is conducted at more than 25 stations from coast to 
coast while the lighter-than-air training is carried on at 
Lakehurst, N. J., and Moffett Field, California. 

Many airplane pilots are commissioned in the Marine 
Corps Reserve although the majority are commissioned 
in the Naval Reserve. All aviators (airship) are commis- 
sioned in the Naval Reserve. 







I N THE BEGINNING 




Young Mark Weber 
meets a group of 
eager, red-blooded 
youths already pa- 
t i e n t 1 y awaiting 
their turn in the 
processing line that 
will take them 
through their V-5 
examinations. 



Filling out the appli- 
cation forms is next 
and Mark Weber 
joins James J. Knof- 
sky. 2 1 , 5423 S. Wol- 
cott Ave., Chicago 
(left) and Richard 
D. Egeland, 19, 4222 
N. Ridgeway Ave., 
Chicago, (center) 
in recording the es- 
sential information. 



I 



FOR 



DAY 




He steps to the reception desk, where he 
is welcomed by a board member. After 
answering questions to determine his 
eligibility for V-5, he receives the neces- 
sary application forms. 



COMPLETE BIOGRAPHICAL 
BACKGROUND AIDS OFFICERS IN 
SELECTING CANDIDATES FOR 
NAVAL AVIATION TRAINING 

Officers af the Cadet Selection Boards who judge the merits 
of those who are applying for aviation training do not rely 
entirely upon their own opinions of a young man. They supple- 
ment this with extensive biographical material and other 
documentary data. Written material sometimes tells a story 
which no conversations could explain thoroughfy. The com- 
pleteness of the papers which must be filled out by candi- 
dates for cadet training is such that a fairly good picture of 
each boy is presented in his application papers, particularly 
when considered in the light of his interviews. 

The information which the cadet must supply includes: (a) 
birth certificate, properly executed, (b) evidence of citizen- 
ship if not native born, (c) rranscript of college record, (d) 
in the absence of a college record, transcript of high school 
record, (e) three letters of recommendation from responsible 
citizens, (f) a resume of not less than fifty words in the ap- 
plicant's own handwriting covering all occupational and other 
experience, including military service or training, (g) written 
consent of applicant's parents or guardian to enlist for avia- 
tion training in the U. S. Naval Reserve (if the cadet is 17 
years of age), (h) two photographs, head and shoulders 
only, size 2'/2 * 2V2 inches, (i) applicants who have had 
previous military or Naval service are required to present 
discharge certificate or certificate in lieu of discharge. 



•J 



WHY AND WHEREFORE 




A preliminary inter- 
view brings out 
Mark Weber's family 
background, his in- 
terests, his ambition 
to be a fighter pilot 
for the Navy, and 
other pertinent in- 
formation. 



THE EYES HAVE IT 



» 




After successfully 
passing the mental 
and physical exami- 
nations, Mark Weber 
goes before a three- 
officer interviewing 
board. They thor- 
oughly examine 
Weber's potentiali- 
ties of becoming a 
top-notch Naval offi- 
cer and then decide 
... he has it! 



Next stop for Mark Weber is his first 
physical examination, and he comes upon 
a line of hopeful applicants awaiting to 
learn whether their eyes are sufficiently 
sharp to meet rigid requirements. 




YOU'RE IN 




The big moment arrives! Mark A. Weber is sworn in by Lt. 
Comdr. (now Comdr.) Carl G. Olson, Officer in Charge of 
the Naval Aviation Cadet Selection Board, Chicago, for 
the Navy's $27,000 pilot training course that will lead him 
to his Wings of Gold, an officer's commission, and the 
chance to fly a combat plane for the Navy or Marine Corps. 



TARMAC TRAINING 



Editor's note: Diaries are not kept in the Navy 
because it is against regulations to do so. 
The material on this page and on similar pages 
which follow is not actually taken from diaries 
because there is no such source. It is set up 
in this style merely to make it more interesting 
and readable than it might be otherwise. 




Newest stage in the program for Naval Avia- 
tion Cadets is Tarmac Training. Since this step 
(now the initial station for many cadets) has 
been adopted for only a few months, most of 
the cadets now in training have not served as 
Tarmacs. 

In this new phase, the cadets work on plane 
engines etc. and familiarize themselves with 
the workings of the ships which they eventually 
will fly. 

The term "Tarmac" is a carry-over from World 
War I. It had its origin in England where 
"grease monkeys" worked on the planes which 
were located on runways made of tar and 
macadam. 




Inside Information 





1. We take a medical exam at the beginning of training. 

2. Chow at Glenview is excellent and we enjoy every 



3. We receive a good indoctrination in power plants and 



thus learn what helps to make our planes so formidable. 

4. A fine physical training program keeps us in shape 
at all times. 

5. The tread of marching feet is a familiar sound as we 
spend considerable time on the drill field. 



Throughout the nation Naval aviation cadets 
helped to relieve the acute labor shortage 
by aiding farmers in harvesting their crops. 




NAVAL FLIGHT 
PREPARATORY SCHOOLS 



LOCATED on the campuses of colleges and 
universities throughout the nation, Naval 
Flight Preparatory Schools represent on their 
faculty a fine blending of military and civilian 
leadership, pooling resources to get an impor- 
tant job accomplished. The colleges supply 
facilities and a large part of the instructional 
staffs. The Navy supplies cadets, some instruc- 
tors and the military organization necessary 
to conduct the training program. 

Since the Flight Preparatory Schools rep- 
resent the first step in the training for manv 
of the cadets,* it is part of the mission of the 
schools to indoctrinate the students rapidly 
into the customs and traditions of the Navy. 
They are civilians no longer and they quickly 
learn the Navy way of doing things. 

Some of the schools are located in big cities. 
The University of Pennsylvania Flight Pre- 
paratory School, for example, is in the heart 
of Philadelphia (population approximately 
two million people) . Others are located in 
small towns, for example, the school at Col- 
gate University in Hamilton, New York (pop- 
ulation 1700). Some are on the campuses of 
technical schools, such as California Polytech 
at San Luis Obispo, California. Others are at 



navigation rates a number one 
priomy on tne study list. Here 
a cadet at the N. F. P. S. at 
Williams ponders over a per- 
plexing problem. 



institutes where educational subjects receive 
more attention, such as Murray State Teachers 
College in Kentucky. Several are located on 
the campuses of small colleges, like Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, and others at large state uni- 
versities, like the University of Texas. 

As diverse as the cadets who attend them, 
the various Flight Preparatory Schools are 
exactly alike in their mission and they are 
all doing a good job in fulfilling their ob- 
jectives. 

The courses emphasize fundamental sub- 
jects, mastery of which is essential to success 
in the training which is to follow. Most im- 
portant subject at Flight Prep is navigation 
and the accent is on the basic tenets of this 
science. Other subjects include mathematics, 
physics, aerology, theory of flight, communica- 
tions and recognition. A well rounded mili- 
tary and athletic program supplements the 
academic training. Naval officers handle ad- 
ministration, discipline and military arts and 
teach some of the courses. Civilian instructors 
teach the majority of subjects at the Flight 
Preparatory Schools. The courses at Flight 
Preparatory Schools last approximately fifteen 
weeks. 

At many schools there are other military 
units. Yet none of them has more esprit de 
corps than the V-5 cadets. A few of their 
activities are pictured on this page. 




(Above) There is time for recreation. 
(Below) A cadet's locker must be ship-shape. 



*Some go to Tarmac Training 



Soccer is a popular sport and a good training device for it enables cadets to control their own weight and 
the ball at the same time. Flight Prep cadets go in for the rugged game in a big way. 





NAVAL FLIGHT 
PREPARATORY SCHOOL 




1. We do not wonder who gets the bugler up, for 
cadot toots a trumpet but it still brings forth unwel- 
come sounds early in the morning. 

2. Morning inspection demands neat appearance. in- 
Head is a busy place as we make ready tor the day's 
occupation. 

3. Ground school activities are of paramount im- 
portance. Accent is on navigation but we have con- 
siderable work in other subjects. Here we learn about 
the rib structure of a Cub wing. 



tu o er ^ IS , notnm 9 llke mai ! from home. The line at 
the P. O. loo.ts like the crowd waiting vo get World 
series tickets, eager, hopeful and anxious. 

5. There is no expanse of land anywhere which can test 
men more than that territory which we so fondly call 

Agony HiH." • 

6. _ When we stray off the path we sometimes have to 
visit the Discipline Office and one never knows how 
he may be penalized for an infraction of the rules. 




1. From dawn to dusk cadets at C.A.A. War 
Training Service Schools march to their activities. 
This picture was taken at Central Michigan Col- 
lege at Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

2. This is an unposed picture snapped by a 
photographer at the C.A.A. War Training Ser- 
vice School at Cornell University. The occasion 
was a final examination in navigation. Cadet 
Wilbur James Bevin of Rochester. New York, is 
in the right foreground. 

3. Dr. Warren K. Green, well known member of 
Amherst College faculty, assists Cadet Harley G. 
Flinn with navigation problem at Amherst C.A.A. 
War Training Service School. 

4. Line inspection is made before each flight at 
each school. Scene of this photograph is the 
C.A.A. War Traininq Service Muhlenbarg-Mora- 
vian School at Bethlehem, Pa. 

5. A cadet at the C.A.A. War Training Service 
School at Keene, N. H., Teachers College smiles 
as he receives the word from his instructor to 
take over the controls. They are flying a dual 
control Cub. 

6. Initiation after the first solo is a regular ritual 
in flying circles. Cadet Thomas Emmons of Detroit 
has just soloed at Kalamazoo Airport and thus 
he does not mind the dunking too much. 

7. Volley ball is a popular phase of the physical 
training program at all schools. This picture was 
snapped by faculty member Dr. Oran Stanley of 
Colgate University. 



CADETS who satisfactorily complete their 
Flight Preparatory School courses continue 
on to a C. A. A. War Training Service (WTS) 
School for twelve weeks of additional training. 
The WTS schools are operated in conjunction 
with various colleges throughout the country 
and the flight training is conducted at airports 
or as close to the school as possible. 

In these schools college faculty instruct the 
cadets in the ground school subjects of naviga- 
tion, aerology, communications, etc., while 
Naval personnel handle the military aspects, 
check flight training at various stages, and su- 
pervise the continuation of the Physical Train- 
ing Program. These schools are conducted 
under Navy regulations and the discipline is the 
same as in other stages of training. 

Approximately one-half of the day is spent 
at the airport where the cadets receive their 
first instruction in flying and are taught by 
licensed Civil Aeronautics Administration in- 
structors, while the other half of the day is 
devoted to ground school instruction. 

Flight training is divided into two stages, 
elementary and intermediate. In the first stage 
simple maneuvers are taught while in the sec- 
ond stage more advanced instruction is offered. 

In elementary training the majority of the 
Schools use Piper Cubs, called "Gremlins," 
"Baby Carriages," "Parachutes with a forward 
thrust," etc., by the cadets. 

A high-wing monoplane, the Cub has an en- 
closed cockpit with two-place tandem seating. 
Some airports use Aeroncas, Taylorcrafts, In- 
sterstates, Porterfields, Luscombes, and other 
light aircraft. 

After eight hours of -instruction most cadets 
are ready to solo. If it appears that a cadet 
will not be ready to solo when he should, he 
is given a check ride with the chief pilot who 
suggests methods of overcoming various dif- 
ficulties. With few exceptions cadets solo in 
the required time. It is interesting to note that 
veteran aviators who operate most of the WTS 
flight schools are almost unanimous in their 
belief that the first solo flight is the safest. 
When the cadet is ready to fly alone he is more 
cautious than at any other time in his career. 
Accidents at this stage are rare and are much 
less likely than at any other stage of solo fly- 
ing. 

After successful completion of eight weeks 
of elementary training the cadet begins four 
weeks of intermediate training. In many in- 
stances he continues to fly a Cub. At some sta- 
tions he will take his training in a Waco, 
Fairchild, or similar planes of greater horse- 
power than those used in elementary. These 
afford the cadet experience in handling heavier 
and faster craft and it sometimes happens that 
a cadet who can fly a light plane without any 
trouble has considerable difficulty in mastering 
the heavier ship. 

• Upon completion of the required check out 
in flying plus satisfactory marks in ground 
school subjects, the cadet moves on to Pre- 
Flight training. 




C. A. A. - WAR TRAINING 
SERVICE SCHOOL 




1. In our first day at tha airport our instructor gave us a 
word picture of the ship in its component parts . and in its 
entirety. 

2. We signed clearance sheets which carried the informa- 
tion that: I. A complete line inspection had been made; 

2. We would not fly over restricted areas. 

3. The instructor prepared us for our first ta!;e-off by ex- 
plaining the initial day's flight plan. 



4. Our first flight completed, we learned how to put our 
"baby" to bed. 

5. We cannot remember any occasion which gave us the 
thrill we experienced today when we soloed for the first 
time. The photographer snapped this picture just as we 
got out of the plane. 

6. At the conclusion of each flight we guide the plane to the 
hangar in order to prevent it from over-turning. 



FOR THE 
AGE OF 
FLIGHT" 



First to produce 100-octane aviation gaso- 
line in commercial quantities, Shell scien- 
tists also had a major part in developing 
the Alkylation Process which resulted in 
more aviation gasoline from a barrel of 
crude. And just last year they again in- 
creased the yield of 100-octane fuel with 
a new and plentiful "stepper - upper." 
. . . Achievements that have resulted in 
"Finer Fuels for the Age of Flight." 




Navy Patrol Bombers are equipped to carry 
on in good weather and bad. The Marquette 
Windshield Wiper is a vital part of that equip- 
ment, assuringclear sight through rain and sleet. 



METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

CLEVELAND 10. OHIO 




21 



am a united states navy flyer. . 
my countrymen built the best 
airplane in the world and en - 
trusted it to me. they Trained 
me to fly it/- i will use it to the 
^ absolute limit of my power, f 
ask the help of god in — - 
making that eff 
great enough, 




CAPTAIN CHARLES E. SMITH, USN 
COMMANDING OFFICER. IKm 



PRE-FLIGHT SCHOOL 
ATHENS, GEORGIA,,. 

<>>< -0M 

7' l> If * 1 ' 




XCELLE.NT I . ■'. : v 

WlMdi^: UEUT. COMM. RALPH W. BURLEIGH, USNR 

°' ^ ATHENS HAS PEAL FYFCUTlVE OF~F~ICElR— 

sourhEQN atmospece: AXIS TRIAL?,, , / rr ' 






llr 

j^ilmp- -- 

INFLATION /sFab inthVS. ai 

'-> r~ T^g^P^ 

vl, ;- . y\ 

UN- EXPECTATION 




AGGRESSIVENE5S I S THE BASIS OF ALU PKE FMGHT TEAIN»N<= 



'BOXING I S A Vtf ' ■ M ' : . j 1 ' ^f? 

Popular spokt — - . Y * A- W' 

UEUT COM0R. W. MADISON 3ELL, 
ATHL.BTIC DI&ElCTOa- 



I 



22 



Activities At Georgia Pre-Flight Indicate 
Nation Doing Right Well On Subject Of 
Sports For War's Sake 



mm 



BY ROMNE Y— W HEELER 

Regional Sports Editor, The Associated Press, Atlanta. Georgia 



ATHENS, GA. — For a nation 
/-% brought up on sport for sport's 
sake, I think we're doing right 
well on the subject of sports for war's 
sake. And if we need a symposium on 
it, I can think of no one better quali- 
fied to lead it than the men who head 
the Navy's Pre-Flight Athletic Program. 

Off-hand, I can't recollect which of 
the Axis partners said Americans were 
soft — and it doesn't matter much. Per- 
haps a lot of our boys were soft. But 
not now. At least, not those who were 
fortunate enough to win an assignment 
to one of the Navy's big Pre-Flight 
Schools. 

The athletic program is tough. So is 
war. The Navy's future airmen, when 
they finish pre-flight training, are as 
tough or tougher than the enemy they'll 
meet. That's why a lot of them will be 
coming home — a lot more than won hi 
have come home had they done their 
training the easy way. 

If anyone needed an excuse for an 
athletic program, that's it. I can't 
think of a better one. 

Primary maxim of the Pre-Flight 
Athletic Program is summed up grimly, 
thus: "No sport for sport's sake. The 
only excuse for any sport in this pro- 
gram is exclusively what it contributes 
to make a better fighting man." 

It has been my pleasure to visit the 
Pre-Flight School at Athens, Georgia. 
Like everyone else, who has seen that 
fine station, I came away impressed 
with the high quality of accomplish- 
ment as exemplified in the physical and 
mental improvement of the cadets who 
trained there. It is no difficult assign- 
ment to pick out the newly-entered pla- 
toon as against those which have been 
at Athens for several weeks. The proof 
of the pudding is in every activity in 
which you see the cadets. This story 
deals primarily with the Pre-Flight 
School at Athens, but it might just as 
easily apply to any of the other Pre- 



Flight stations. Men who have visited 
all five tell me that there is great simi- 
larity throughout the training pro- 
grams at the different Pre-Flight 
Schools. 

I think the unique thing about the 
Program is that physical training — or 
more exactly, physical toughening — 
counts equally with academic and mili- 
tary grades in a cadet's final, over-all 
mark and his final standing in the 
class with which he graduates. The 
laggard doesn't last. 

Every cadet competes — and I mean 
exactly that — in boxing, soccer, wrest- 
ling, hand to hand combat, swimming, 
gymnastics, tumbling, military track, 
basketball and football. There are no 
bench-warmers. There is no scrub team 
that sees 15 minutes of action on Tues- 
days and Thursdays. Every boy goes all 
the way. An incentive for superior per- 
formance is provided in regimental 
championships every other Sunday. 

These regimental finals produce a 
quality of play and a keenness of com- 
petition comparable to the average in- 




23 



tercollegiate athletics — barring per- 
haps the super-precision performance 
of big league football teams, or the 
record-breaking track marks of schol- 
arship athletes. 

Co-ordination of brain and muscles 
— hair-trigger co-ordination. That's 
what it takes for superior fliers. That's 
what the Pre-Flight Schools are produc- 
ing, with outstanding instructors drawn 
from the best-qualified men in the high 
school and college coaching profession. 
That's why American Navy fliers are 
knocking down five, eight, a dozen or 
more enemy planes for every one of 
their own men lost. That's why Amer- 
ican Navy fliers are coming home. 

But don't get the idea the Pre-Flight 
Schools are just mighty muscle-fac- 
tories. 

Academic and military arts subjects, 
which must be mastered by all cadets, 
include military drill, aerology, ord- 
nance and gunnery, seamanship, first- 
aid, self-preseravtion, communications 
(such as radio, semaphore and blinker), 
navigation, recognition of aircraft and 
surface craft, and Essentials of Naval 
Service. Again, outstanding profes- 
sional teachers and military experts are 
in charge of the cadet classes. 

Bounding out the Program, and giv- 
ing the public a chance to see a few 
of these future fighters in action, is 
the varsity athletic program, embrac- 
ing football, basketball, track and box- 
ing. There the top-flight men get a 
chance, brieflly, to match their strength 
and wits and ability with the best men 
left in intercollegiate sport. 

But never lose sight of the Pre- 
Flights' basic intra-regimental sports. 
Never lose sight of that slogan, "Sports 
for War's sake." 

The Axis coined the phrase: "Live 
Dangerously!" 

But I'll take the Navy Flyers. 



U. S. NAVY PRE-FLIGHT SCHOOL 

ATHENS, GEORGIA. 




You've Got to Study 



1. It is merely a recording of a bugle call but you 
can't say, "Wait a minute" when it's time to get up 
in the morning. 

2. There is time enough for a good clean shave pro- 
viding that not a second is wasted. 

3. The long distances between buildings afford good 
opportunity for us to march to our heart's content — 
and then some. 

4. Knowledge of celestial navigation may be the thread 



on which a flyer's life may hang. 

5. Sports for all is no idle phrase at a Pre-Flight 
School. Football is a popular activity with everyone 
here. 

6. There is a lot of homework to do, and if you vail 
to do it you will not last long here. 

7. We have good food and plenty of it. Our meals 
contain about twice as many calories as any food 
served at pre-war football training tables. 





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Products 



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MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN 



Production of 
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SOLVING intricate production problems called 
for in the manufacture of high-precision aircraft 
devices is another contribution Foote Bros. Gear 
and Machine Corporation is making toward speed- 
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Precision gears for reducers for azimuth and 
elevation control of guns in turrets in the B-17 
bombers — gear assemblies to raise and lower the 
landing gear of the AT-21 trainers — cowl actuating 
jacks to operate ventilators on oil coolers on P-38 
interceptors — all these devices call for light weight 
coupled with extreme precision. 

Foote Bros, engineering experience and manu- 
facturing "know-how" acquired in the production 
of precision gears in tremendous quantities for Pratt 
& Whitney aircraft engines assure the production of 
these special devices in the quantities required to meet 
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25 




26 



Naval Aviation Comes To Chapel Hill 

Value of Vigorous Contact Sports Proved in North Carolina 



BY ARTHUR SIEGEL 

Sports Editor, Boston Traveler 



CHAPEL Hill was proud and en- 
thusiastic. But Chapel Hill also 
was cautious and self-conscious. 
For, a year ago, Chapel Hill had its first 
class of Navy Aviation Pre-Flight 
Trainees, yet some of its inhabitants 
were fearful of the derision that al- 
ready had guffawed "Supermen" at the 
staff and cadets there at North Carolina. 

So short a time ago, Chapel Hill had 
been only the site of the University of 
North Carolina. For that matter, ex- 
cept for the residents of the Carolinas, 
the alumni of the University and, per- 
haps, a few neighbors, few knew just 
what Chapel Hill wasC But Chapel Hill, 
or that part of the North Carolina cam- 
pus that had been taken over by the 
Navy, was beginning to assume a new 
identity. It no longer was the town 
with the main street. It no longer mere- 
ly was the place where the University 
of North Carolina was located. Chapel 
Hill was Navy Pre-Flight and was be- 
coming familiar to millions. Not North 
Carolina Navy Aviation Pre-Flight, not 
anything formal. Just Chapel Hill and 
the visions of hundreds of Navy Avia- 
tion cadets marching everywhere with 
a cadence measured by the booming 
voices of fighting men of cadets being 
taught that there must be no fear and 
being so taught through the medium 
of a three-months' program of combat 
sports. 

Pre-Flight Training was conceived 
in Washington and born in Annapolis, 
where the first instructors were in- 
doctrinated. In the East Chapel Hill was 
the cradle and the nursery of Pre- 
Flight for the cadets from the Atlantic 
Seaboard. 

Chapel Hill is better known to most 
of the officers in the Naval Aviation 
Physical Training Program than any 
other station. For it is here that hun- 
dreds of newly-commissioned officers 
come for their indoctrination, to learn 
about Pre-Flight and to extend the saga 
of Pre-Flight to the Seven Seas. Upon 
completion of their training they are 
scattered to distant points, but they 
will tell you that always they retain a 
place in their hearts for Chapel Hill — 
for this was their first Navy address 
. . . this was where they discovered 
that their coaching mannerisms of 
peace-time days might not be entirely 
adequate in handling their war-time 
duties . . . this was where they saw the 
worthwhileness of the entire program 
as they watched the improvement in 
the cadets from day to day and this 
was where they learned to be officers 
in the Navy and instructors in a pro- 
gram of which they are justifiably 
proud. 

But that first year, even as now 
Chapel Hill was a place with a mission. 
There never was any doubt of the pur- 




pose and the great service it was offer- 
ing. But there were critics. There were 
those who thought calisthenics suf- 
ficient, with some boxing and wrestling 
added for spice. There were those con- 
servatives who thought that Pre-Flight 
training was unnecessary because they 
had become flyers without that train- 
ing. And the jeer of "Supermen" was 
all too audible, specially in the imagin- 
ation. There were even whispers that 
these officers, the builders of Super- 
men, were merely parking in nice 
peaceful spots for the duration. 

Chapel Hill — the Navy's Chapel Hill 
— wasn't beautiful a year ago. It was 
too new. There were too many evi- 
dences of new construction. The grass 
hadn't grown and the strawberry-blond 
soil of North Carolina pinked in the 
rays of the sun. But every bare spot 
was a signpost that Chapel Hill was 
creating something. The obstacle 
course, at which civilians gaped and 
then recoiled horrifiedly when asked 
if they would like a test run . . . the 
fields where the hand-to-hand combat 
was being taught . . . the baseball field 
enhanced by big league style dugouts 
which were built by the cadets and the 
covered pavilion where the punching 
bags rattled and where the thumps of 
eager wrestlers boomed. 

No cadet was asked to do any more 
than his instructor. Football was 
taught by men who could take a bruis- 
ing, by men who had proved their 
physical fitness only a short time pre- 
viously. Jimmy Crowley was the boss 
of football and he had some swell aides. 
In the swimming pool men were learn- 
ing to swim who never knew how be- 
fore and men who thought they knew 




how to swim were learning how to swim 
wearing full equipment. 

There wasn't any over-emphasis on 
any one thing. There were excellent 
military and academic programs to go 
hand in hand with the athletic activi- 
ties. In fact anyone who has visited 
the station fail to be impressed with 
the military atmosphere that permeates 
the "Hill." Of all the lasting impres- 
sions that one gains from a stay at the 
Pre-Flight School none is more signifi- 
cant from a sports standpoint than 
that of cadets, hundreds of cadets, 
marching to all activities in strict mili- 
ary formation. Wearing the athletic 
gear of the sport in which they are 
about to compete the cadets march to 
the fields of play — and every cadet par- 
ticipates in every sport. 

If there was any over emphasis in the 
complete program it was in a fervor to 
turn out air cadets who would not mere- 
ly go out to battle, but would come 
back from battle because they had been 
schooled to know no fear, had been 
schooled to react quickly, had been 
schooled to be on the alert all the time, 
had been schooled to be aggressive, had 
been schooled to a disregarding of a 
physical limit of endurance. 

The Captain at Chapel Hill was Com- 
mander O. O. Kessing, who wasted no 
time in announcing that his name was 
Scrappy. Today he's Captain Kessing, 
out in the South Pacific and he's still 
Scrappy. He was decorated only a few 
months ago. His executive officer was 
Commander John P. Graff, who today 
is the Captain at Chapel Hill. Crowley 
is in the South Pacific. So many have 
gone — to other schools, to other sta- 
tions, to carriers, to air bases wherever 
a Navy flyer must be. Not many are 
left. Only a few, who preserve the 
tradition of Chapel Hill — for Pre- 
Flight training became a tradition in 
one short year. The fields no longer 
are bare. The soil is covered by grass. 
And the legends grow. 

The critics have been silenced. 
Others saw and borrowed. The obstacle 
course is found on school and college 
fields. The spirit of aggressiveness, of 
hard play, of effervescent health, now 
is a common factor in the American 
life. For Chapel Hill has proved that 
the American youth are not, sardonical- 
ly, Supermen, but boys and men who 
can win and are winning. From Aus- 
tralia to Alaska, the enemy has learned 
that much. 

And may there still be a Chapel Hill 
when the war ends. For Chapel Hill 
does not merely mean a man without 
fear, a man who is the fittest survivor 
physically. Chapel Hill means an 
American who, in those three months, 
also learned loyalty to his country, love 
of his family and faith in his God. 



27 



U. S. NAVY PRE-FLIGHT SCHOOL 
CHAPEL HILL. NORTH CAROLINA 




1. We like it here at the Hill. 

2. We learn how to take and send code by wire and 
blinker systems. 

3. Carrying on our back a pack which is 1/3 of our 
body weight, we step up and down monotonously in 
the pack test. 

4. Our own competition completed for the day, we 



relax a bit as we watch some of our mates perform in 
a squadron contest. 

5. Taps is at 2130 but before the bugle sounds we 
spend plenty of time at our books. 
4. Some nights we stand sentry watch, but we are up 
at the regular time the following day and we partici- 
pate in all activities. 



C T 


I T 1 C T 1 P C 

A 1 1 o 1 1 I o 


n c 
U r 


P A M D 

I A IYI r 


LEJEUNE 


rUUlDALL oil 


No. 


Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 




Age 


Home Town 


53 


tJaklarz, JoJin 


1 


£ O 

6-3 


O O A 


26 


riicorse, Mich. 


45 


oeckwith, Bob 


1 


6-1 


one 


Zo 


Hartford, Conn. 


52 


D 1 / 1 1 1 

rsehan, Charles 


T? 
Fj 


6-3 y 2 


205 


15 


Crystal Lake, 111. 


33 


Bergman, W alter 


B 


6-2 


192 


23 


Denver, Colo. 


A t\ 

49 


tJoehynski, John 


1 


oi / 

6-2 y 2 


210 


O A 

24 


Salem, Mass. 


12 


orown, John 


B 


5-11 


i on 
lo / 


Z5 


TT; 1 1 • ,1„ tvt T 

Hillside, IN. J. 


44 


Bytsura, George 


G 


6 


O 1 c 

zlo 


15 


Freeland, Pa. 


11 


Cales. Bob 


G 


6 


1 AC 

195 


0 1 
21 


Ironton, Ohio 


Z8 


Constable, iVJatl 


TJ 

B 


5-9y 2 


175 


22 


Cleveland, Ohio 


21 


Cotton, Jim 


B 


O-Z 


O AA 

200 


28 


Palestine, Texas 


1 A 

14 


Dawson, mil 


tp 

L 


0-1 


10c ' 

lo5 


24 


Hudson, Ohio 


A O 

48 


i~v l ■ / * i i 
Urulis, Chuck 


G 


5-10% 


215 


25 


Girardville, Pa. 


39 


I A T 1 TJ 1 

Dubenetzky, raul 


B 


6-1 


197 


20 


X> 1^1, AT V 

Brooklyn, ri. 1. 


i a 

19 


CiVickFon, Man 


Cr 


5-11 


200 


O A 

24 


Pompton Lakes, N. J. 


47 


litch, Hob 


1 1 

L 


6-iy 2 


210 


OO 


Indianapolis, Minn. 


46 


r leming, Uonn 


B 


6 


10c 

185 


0 /i 
24 


bioux City, Iowa 


37 


rord, hd 


B 


6 


188 


0 0 
23 


JVlinerva, Uhio 


34 


rracassi, Irus 


tx 


6 


O A C 

205 


o*c 

26 


TVT^ ^ TP „ 1 1 TVT V" 

IMiagara rails, IN. 1. 


29 


Ciannim, Angelo 


1 


6 


202 


OA 

20 


Monessen, Pa. 


/I A 

40 


T 1 

Greer. John 


C 


6-2 


200 


21 


White Plains, IN. 1. 


50 


XT 11 'I 1 

Hall, lom 




6y2 


192 


22 


Benton Harbor, Mich. 


o c 


Irby, Clarage 


T) 


c in 

5-10 


185 


20 


TT ' / " ' TP1 

Haines City, rla. 


27 


Kiesecker, frank 


B 


5-91/2 


180 


22 


1 I . J TVT 1 

Hempstead, INew York 


16 


If 1 1 A 1 

Kleinhenz, Alex 


B 


6 


lob 


OO 

22 


T ' *11 IT 

Louisville, Ivy. 


15 


T I. T 1 

Lanahan, John 


C 


6-1% 


195 


22 


f 1 '11 TT 1 

Jacksonville, rla. 


26 


T All 

Lang, AJlan 


B 


C 1 1 

5-11 


195 


1 0 
18 


Cincinnati, Uhio 


1 Q 

lo 


Leugo, Alex 


<^ 

\T 


o-l 


193 


O O 

23 


Chicago, 111. 


5U 


TIT I • 1 • TT 

IVlaliszewski, Henry 


L 


6 


1 oc 

185 


O A 

24 


ly: tvt . to 

W. INatrona, Jra. 


9 /I 

24 


A 1 • * 1 

IVIannmo, Al 


i 1 

h. 


5-11 


O A f* 

205 


0 0 
23 


\\ . /' 1 I TVT | 

Westneld, IN. J. 


31 


LVleek, Jim 


1 


6-4 


207 


27 


Cageby, lexas 


56 


A T TTJ'll 

Meyer, mil 


T? 

£i 


6-4y 2 


2U0 


lo 


7YT TJ . , TVT TT 

IN. Hampton, IN. H. 


57 


IVlitchell, Hick 


L 


6-1 


195 


OA 

20 


Wilmington, Del. 


35 


Murphy, Ld 


Jbi 


6-1 


190 


24 


T 11 TVfl" 

Lowell, Mass. 


41 


Murphy, Geo. 


hi 


6 


185 


O O 

22 


South Bend, Ind. 


A O 

43 


~\k i ■ ) i 

IVlurphv, Jraul 


C 


6-1 


185 


0 1 

21 


Medtord, Mass. 


C A 

54 


INen, Bob 


T 


6-1 y 2 


218 


OO 

15 


Buckhannon, W. Va. 


Lo 


reace. Kill 


B 


5-11 


190 


0 0 
23 


I I 1 TVT 

Henderson, i\. C. 


59 


jrhillips, Jim 


B 


6 


205 


1 A 

19 


/^l- * Til 

Chicago, 111. 


i n 
1 1 


ronselle, lom 


(j 


5-9 


200 


O A 

24 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


o o 

38 


Jrurucker, Gil 


B 


6 


190 


O /T 

26 


Sacramento, Cam. 


r i 

51 


babasteanski, Joe 


G 


6-2 


ZU5 


zz 


TI .1 ,1 H/T • 

Portland, Maine 


o o 

22 


savage, Kay 


B 


5-11% 


180 


21 


TP *11 T J 

rLvansville, Ind. 


o o 

32 


sexton, hjd. 


B 


6 


195 


20 


I I 1 TVT \ 

Hempstead, IN. 1. 


3£ 

.)U 


Speth, George 


T 
1 


o-z 


215 


25 


ijunaio, in. 1 . 


10 


Stalnaker, R. W. 


E 


6 


185 


23 


Akron, Ohio 


42 


Sullivan, Larry 


T 


6-2% 


215 


23 


Brockton, Mass. 


20 


Terrell, Ray 


B 


6 


182 


24 


Penns Grove, N. J. 


58 


Vaznelis, Albin 


B 


5-9 


175 


24 


New Britain, Conn. 



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31 




RCA AVIATION RADIO 

Efficiency and stamina proved by severe and exhaustive 
tests at every step of design and production 





SHAKE-DOWN TEST 

Just as a naval vessel undergoes a shake-down 
cruise, RCA Aviation Radio equipment gets 
its '"shake-down" cruise, right in the RCA 
laboratory. On the machine shown above, it 
is subjected to vibration up to 3.000 cycles 
a second. Vibration duplicating that of the 
smallest plane to the largest bomber— accel- 
erations equivalent to ten gravities' 



ALTITUDE: 40,000 FEET 

In this RCA plastic "altitude" chamber RCA 
Aviation Radio equipment is tested at low 
atmospheric pressures— checked for high alti- 
tude flashovers and leaks— scanned for tuning 
shifts and "breathing"— inspected for evidence 
of every kind having any possible bearing on 
its ability to give dependable service at any 
altitude. 



32 



ARCTIC REHEARSAL 

It's cold at high altitudes— but aircraft 
radio must function despite frigid tem- 
peratures. That is why RCA Aviation 
Radio equipment is subjected to intense 
cold in RCA laboratory refrigeration 
chambers — cold well below the lowest 
stratospheric temperatures — as low as 
-76°F. 




RCA "SWEAT ROOM" 

In steaming jungle landing-fields and dis- 
persal areas RCA Aviation Radio equip- 
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—regardless of heat and humidity. The 
ability of RCA aircraft radio units to meet 
extreme requirements is assured by exposure 
to steam-saturated atmosphere at 140°F. 
and 95% humidity! 



RCA VICTOR DIVISION 



RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 



33 



STATISTICS OF NORTH CAROLINA PRE-FLIGHT FOOTBALL SQOAD 



No. Name 


Position 


Home Town 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Age 


38 Annis, Robert E. 


B 


Plattsburg, N. Y. 


5-10 


177 


19 


28 Berthold, Robert 


B 


South Charleston, W. Va. 


5-8 


150 


20 


15 Budciarowski, S. 


B 


Ipswich, Mass. 


5-11 


175 


21 


61 Budd, William 


G 


Camden, N. J. 


5-10 


195 


22 


67 Callahan, Robert 


G 


Rochester, N. Y. 


5-10 


179 


19 


33 Cleri, Victor 


B 


Lockport, N. Y. 


5-8 


155 


21 


64 Collins, John 


G 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


5-8 


176 


23 


47 Cook, Kenneth, 


B 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


5-7 


155 


20 


57 Copeland, George 


C 


Coatesville, Pa. 


5-10 


185 


20 


75 Douglas, James 


T 


Reedville, Va. 


6-2 


189 


20 


81 Duffy, James T. 


E 


Troy, N. Y. 


6 


180 


19 


79 Evangelista, P. 


G 


Liverpool, N. Y. 


5-8 


191 


21 


18 Gale, George 


B 


Mishawaka, Ind. 


5-10 


180 


25 


89 Golash, E. 


E 


Northampton, Mass. 


5-9 


180 


20 


69 Guzzo, Louis 


G 


West Hartford, Conn. 


5-9 


175 


19 


74 Hallsey, H. F. 


T 


Saco, Maine 


6-1 


180 


22 


43 Hannigan, William 


B 


Rockland, Mass. 


5-6 


160 


23 


16 Hare, Cecil 


B 


Spokane, Wash. 


5-9 


190 


24 


50 Hart, Paul 


C 


Folcroft, Pa. 


5-11 


180 


20 


45 Hecker, L. M. 


B 


Palmetto, Fla. 


5-10 


175 


20 


21 Hilliard, Harry 


B 


Sharpsburg, Pa. 


5-10 


169 


20 


11 Holbrook, William 


B 


East Lansing, Mich. 


5-11 


180 


19 


54 Holland, Eugene 


C 


Liberty, N. Y. 


5-9 


174 


20 


25 Holmes, Richard A. 


B 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


5-10 


186 


23 


95 Hynes, Thomas 


G 


Parkersburg, W. Va. 


. 6 


193 


20 


65 Jones, Donald 


G 


Lancaster, Pa. 


6 


180 


26 


97 Johnson, Wesley 


T 


North Attleboro, Mass. 


6-2 


200 


23 


70 Kies, Walter 


T 


Woodside, N. Y. 


6-1 


200 


20 


92 Kolakowski, M. 


G 


Hartford, Conn. 


5-11 


188 


19 


63 Krapf, Frederick 


G 


Wilmington, Del. 


5-11 


204 


20 


84 La Pointe, Arthur 


E 


Salem, Mass. 


6-2 


182 


19 


58 Lawrence, Edward 


C 


Pompton Lakes, N. J. 


6 


170 


22 


60 Learned, William C. 


G 


Clinton, Mass. 


5-6 


180 


22 


68 Long, William R. 


G 


Cumberland, Md. 


6 


180 


20 


86 Lovett, Eugene 


E 


Cambridge, Mass. 


6-1 


200 


23 


80 Lowans, Warren 


T 


Columbia, Pa. 


6-1 


190 


21 


88 McAndrew, Richard 


E 


Rochester, N. Y. 


6 1 


179 


21 


72 McNulty, John 


T 


Milton, Mass. 


6-1 


195 


23 


29 Miller, John T. 


B 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


6 


185 


20 


39 Moriarta, Webster 


B 


West Chester, Pa. 


5-10 


185 


20 


36 Moses, James S. 


B 


Bessemer, Pa. 


5-9 


170 


20 


35 Nute, Warren 


B 


New Bedford, Mass. 


5-11 


175 


22 


27 O'Connell, Vincent 


B 


Burrellville, R. I. 


5-7 


166 


21 


26 O'Kane, Arthur P. 


B 


Atlantic City, N. J. 


6 


178 


21 


82 Osborn, Harold 


E 


Hempstead, N. Y. 


6-1 


186 


24 


56 Piotrowski, Stanley 


C 


Valencia, Pa. 


5-10 


168 


19 


94 Rooney, Frederick 


G 


Norwalk, Conn. 


5-10 


180 


20 


76 Sachlehen W C 


T 


Sicklerville N T 

t 1 i • %. 1 " 1 V III'* J. 1 • ,f ■ 


6-1 


181 


21 


59 Salocks, Robert 


C 


New Milford, Conn. 


6 


190 


20 


71 Stankiewicz, M. G. 


T 


Plantsville, Conn. 


5-8 


190 


19 


83 Tuttle, William I. 


E 


Flushing, N. Y. 


6-2 


203 


19 


91 Walls, L. L. 


E 


Wilmington, Del. 


6 


180 


20 


93 Woodburn, Robert 


E 


Oswego, N. Y. 


6-2 


178 


20 


ft ft ft 




ft ft ft 









34 



VINCO OPTICAL MASTER 
Y HNV-V INSPECTION DIVID- 
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8855 SCHAEFER HIGHWAY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, U.S.A. 



The familiar bomber nose 
is a PLEXIGLAS nose 



"P'.exiclas, the crystal-clear acrylic 
plastic in the familiar bomber 
nose and other transparent parts aboard 
every type of Navy plane, was de- 
veloped in Rohm & Haas laboratories, 
first brought to commercial production 
in Rohm & Haas plants. 




3 awards to Rohm £? Haas 
Company and its associated 
firms, The Resinous Products 
& Chemical Company and 
Charles Lennig & Company. 



ROHM & HAAS COMPANY 

Washington Square, Phila. 5, Pa. 

Manufacturers of Chemicals including Plastics . . . 
Synthetic Insecticides . . . Fungicides . . . En- 
zymes . . . Chemicals for the Leather, Textile and 
other Industries. 




KOLLSMAN 



AIRCRAFT 
INSTRUMENTS 




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ELMHURST, NEW YORK 



GLENDALE. CALIFORNIA 



AEROQUIP HOSE LINES 



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AEROQUIP CORPORATION 

JACKSON, MICHIGAN. U . 5. A. 



35 



LE 
Fitch 
47 



LT 

Neff 
54 



CAMP LEJEUNE 



LG 

Drulis 
48 



LH 
Terrell 
20 



Sabasteanski 
51 

QB 
Cotton 
21 



FB 
Lang 
26 



RG 
Erickson 
19 



RH 

Bergman 
33 



RT 
Sullivan 

42 



RE 

Murphv, Geo. 
41 



SQUAD LIST 



10 


Stalnaker, R., e 


22 


Savage, Ray, b 


35 


Murphy, Ed, e 


47 


Fitch, Bob, e 


11 


Cales, Bob, g 


24 


Mannino, Al, e 


36 


Speth, George, t 


48 


Drulis, Chuck, g 
Bochynski, John, t 


12 


Brown, John, b 


25 


Irby, Clarage, b 


37 


Ford, Ed, b 


49 


13 


Peace, Bill, b 


26 


Lang, Allan, b 


38 


Purucker, Gil, b 


50 


Maliszewski, Henry, e 


14 


Dawson, Bill, e 


27 


Kiesecker, Frank, b 


39 


Dubenetzky, Paul, b 


51 


Sabasteanski, Joe, c 


15 


Lanahan, John, c 


28 


Constable, Matt, b 


40 


Greer, John, c 


52 


Behan, Charles, e 


16 


Kleinhenz, Alex, b 


29 


Giannini, Angelo, t 


41 


Murphy, Geo., e 


53 


Baklarz, John, t 


17 


Ponselle, Torn, g 


30 


Hall, Tom, b 


42 


Sullivan, Larry, t 


54 


Neff, Bob, t 


18 


Leugo, Alex., t 


31 


Meek, Jim, g 


43 


Murphy, Paul, c 


56 


Meyer, Bill, e 


19 


Erickson, Stan, g 


32 


Sexton, Ed., b 


44 


Bytsura, George, g 


57 


Mitchell, Dick, e 


20 


Terrell, Ray, b 


33 


Bergman, Walter, b 


45 


Beckwith, Bob, t 


58 


Vaznelis, A., b 


21 


Cotton, Jim, b 


34 


Fracassi, Gus, g 


46 


Fleming, Donn, b 


59 


Phillips, Jim, b 



NORTH CAROLINA PRE-FLIGHT 



LE 

Norman 
85 



LT 

Lowans 
80 



LG 
Long 
68 



LH 

Nute 
35 



C 
Hart 

24 

QB 
Miller 
29 



FB 

Hare 
16 



RG 

Evangelista 
79 



RH 

Hannigan 

43 



RT 

Douglas 
75 



RE 
Golash 
89 



SQUAD LIST 



11 Holbrook, William, b 

15 Budciarowski, S., b 

16 Hare, Cecil, b 
18 Gale, George, b 
21 Hilliard, Harry, b 
50 Hart, Paul, g 

25 Holmes, Riciiard A., b 

26 O'Kane, Arthur P., b 

27 O'Connell, Vincent, b 

28 Berthold, Robert, b 

29 Miller, John T., b 
33 Cleri, Victor, b 
35 Nute, Warren, b 



36 Moses, James S., b 
38 Annis, Robert E., b 
43 Hannigan, William, b 
45 Hecker, L. M., b 
17 Cook, Kenneth, b 
54 Holland, Eugene, c 

56 Piotrowski, Stanley, c 

57 Copeland, George, c 

58 Lawrence, Edward, c 

59 Salocks, Robert, c 

60 Learned. William C, 

61 Budd, William, g 
63 Krapf, Frederick, g 



64 Collins, John, g 

65 Jones, Donald, g 

67 Callahan, Robert, g 

68 Long, William R. 5 g 

69 Guzzo, Louis, g 

70 Kies, Walter, t 

71 Stankiewicz, M. G., t 

72 McNulty, John, t 

74 Hallsey, H. F., t 

75 Douglas, James, t 

76 Sachleben, W. C, t 

79 Evangelista, P., g 

80 Lowans, Warren, t 



81 Duffy, James, T., e 

82 Osborn, Harold, e 

83 Tuttle, William I., e 

84 La Pointe, Arthur, e 
86 Lovett, Eugene, e 

88 McAndrew, Richard, e 

89 Golash, E., e 

91 Walls, L. L., e 

92 Kolakowski, M., g 

93 Woodburn, Robert, e 

94 Rooney, Frederick, g; 

95 Hynes, Thomas, g 
97 Johnson, Wesley, t 



OFFICIALS 

Referee C. E. Cuddy (Virginia) 

Umpire J. H. Stallings (Duke) 

Linesman G. P. Compton (Randolph Macon) 

Judge L. J. Perry (Elon) 



36 






J&0/T?j&S ggWay/- „ ON SCHEDULE 



"HEARTS - EYES - BRAINS" by 

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37 



1st Lt. Jack Chevigny. U.S.M.C.R. 



Football Coach 
Camp he Jeune 




Lt. Comdr. B. A. Ingwersen, U.S.N. R. 
Director of Athletics 
U. S. Navy Pre-Flight School 



Lt. F. H. Kimbrough, U.S.N.R. 
Head Football Coach 
U. S. Navy Pre-Flight School 




ENLISTED FOR THE DURATION! 
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Cannon flashes from ships out on the edges of 
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upbeat of rolling war drums echoing a mighty 
purpose; a line of war trucks quickly etched 
against a blazing sky and gone again. 

For America. 

For a cottage, a hill and orchard trees, a drowsy 
baby buggy in the sun, a young child in the door- 
way with a smile — with eyes beyond and far- 
flung down the path, and fixed delightedly upon 
a man too tired to lift his happy eyes. 

Afar, a chimney tall and red, a line of smoke, a 
town of homes and people with its bustling streets, 
its vision to be great, its soul, its quickening life. 

This is America. 

FEDERAL MOTOR TRUCK COMPANY 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 




MA5S EXERCISE 



40 



Former Fields Of Sporty Rich Changed To 
Training Station For Rugged Youth At 
Luxurious Del Monte, California 



IF it were not for the hours and the 
labors, pre-flight training in the 
newest Navy school would be a very 
rich dish indeed. 

On the fields of Del Monte, Cali- 
fornia, where the sporty rich used to 
cavort, and in the salons where the 
wealthy idle gathered to kill time, 
selected groups of the youth of the 
land are being taught to kill the as- 
sailants of the United States and 
liberty. 

One accustomed to the fastidious- 
ness of the old idle hour Del Monte 
hotel hardly would recognize it as the 
bustling Monterey spa of today. 

There is swimming in the Roman 
plunge but no photographers pause 
at its rim to get cheesecake art for 
the fancy glazed paper magazines. The 
pool is filled at all hours by hairy 
limbed youngsters learning the latest 
water safety methods, the way to swim 
fully clothed, how to rescue a ship- 
mate and methods for maneuvering 
through burning oil. 

There still is grappling in the famed 
Bali room where society danced and 
the arty groups put on world noted 
dress parties. But it is the honest grap- 
pling of the wrestling mat and the steps 
are not fancy. They are made by eager 
youth avoiding youth in hand to hand 
combat. 

And the Del Monte taproom? The 
beer taps are gone. The display of 
liquors and liquers in fancy bottles has 
long since been removed. The weary 
cadet now pauses there between classes 
and physical drill to refresh himself 
with a sandwich and a glass of malted 
milk. 

They're making men where once 
man made fun. Yet, despite this quick 
transition from peaceful pleasure to 
wartime necessity, very few alterations 
were needed to transform the pleasure 
capital of the Pacific Coast into a sta- 
tion for producing flying Navy men. 

The tremendous polo fields were di- 
vided into athletic layouts for soccer, 
football and touch football. An ob- 
stacle course surrounds them. 

The old theatre, near the polo field, 
is a gymnasium. 

The overstuffed furniture is gone 
from the hotel rooms and suites. The 
twin beds went with it. Each room now 
houses from four to eight cadets. They 
sleep in duble-decker bunks that line 
the walls around the study desks and 
clothes lockers. 

Del Monte's famed cuisine is un- 
touched but the noted chefs are cook- 



BY HARRY BORBA 

Sports Staff. The S. F. Examiner 



ing more food of a less fancy variety. 
Daily they turn out a balanced ration 
that supplies 5,000 calories for each 
student. The garnishments are absent 
but the food is tops. 

There used to be stores along the 
main and basement corridors. There 
the debutantes bought the latest in furs 
and nylons ; the young bucks purchased 
their dancing pumps and smart sports 
shirts. Today these are occupied by the 
officers in the military, academic and 
athletic departments. 

In one of these offices you will find 
Captain George W. Steele, U. S. N. who 
is the ideal commanding officer for a 
pre-flight program. 

Captain Steele opened the west 
coast's first Navy pre-flight plant at 
St. Mary's College, 150 miles away 
near San Francisco bay. He is a former 
captain of the air craft carrier Sara- 
toga and he once commanded the 
lighter-than-air station at Lakehurst, 
N. J. 

The Captain has won the Navy Cross 
and he is also a flying officer. Thus he 
knows all of the angles about the 
hurried business of preparing your men 
to fly fighting ships. 

The executive officer is Lt. Com- 
mander George D. Fitzhugh. He was 
the regimental officer at St. Mary's 
Pre-Flight. 

Captain Steele and Lt. Comdr. Fitz- 
hugh will tell you that they have prob- 
ably the best pre-flight station in the 
country. Thev will explain that it is 
not because of the Del Monte hotel, 
its grounds and facilities. 

They have become boosters for Mon- 
terey peninsula weather. Only one day 
since the school was opened last Febru- 
ary 13 has it been necessary to cancel 
the outdoor physical training pro- 
gram because of bad weather. That is 
extremely important in a course that 
must be jammed into 12 weeks of con- 
centrated work. 




The classes — military and academic 
— go along wet or dry in the various 
convention rooms connected with the 
historic old hotel and in a new build- 
ing constructed for that purpose by the 
Navy. 

In these halls where bellicose sales 
managers taught their often inattentive 
delegates new selling tricks the Navy is 
teaching aerology, navigation, com- 
munications and the other essentials 
of naval service. The nomenclature 
and recognition of ships and planes is 
another important phase of the study 
curriculum. 

The military side trains the young 
officer-to-be in discipline, Navy ways 
and military arts. 

Out on the broad fields where the 
most prized of polo ponies used to 
gallop before bored eyes of idling gal- 
leries, Lt. Bill Kern now is working 60 
young men for an hour a day creating 
the first football team that ever rep- 
resented Del Monte on the fields of 
Autumn valor. 

Kern, former head coach at Carnegie 
Tech and West Virginia after being an 
assistant at Pittsburgh, is the mentor 
for gridironistics. 

Kern recently took over this one 
highly publicized phase of the physical 
fitness program that embraces every- 
thing from a punch in the nose to an 
honest high dive into a cool pool. 

The man who heads the physical 
education department is Lt. M. J. 
"Mike" Gary. Mike was a tackle at the 
University of Minnesota a long time 
ago. For the past 15 years he had been 
athletic director and football coach at 
Western Michigan State College. 

It is Mike's job to see that the ever 
changing cadet body gets its full quota 
of athletic games of every type but 
particularly of the kinds that teach ag- 
gressiveness and combativeness — the 
body contact sports. 

Sports are not taught to make skilled 
athletes out of the cadets. They are 
required so that the future flyer and 
officer will learn timing, coordination, 
quick reaction and the ability to snap 
back to the fight after a hard wallop. 
While he learns these he adds to the 
stamina reservoir. 

Years gone by when you said you 
were going to Del Monte you were ad- 
mitting you were one of the elite. 

Today, when you go to Del Monte, 
you are one of the select. And you stay 
12 weeks — if you work hard, play 
harder and study longer. 



11 



U. S. NAVY PRE-FLISHT SCHOOL 
DEL MONTE, CALIFORNIA. 




1. It does not take you long to learn how to shave 
rapidly for someone else always is waiting to use the 
mirror. 

2. A photographer never has to ask cadets to pose in 
a recognition class for we must be attentive every 
split second if we want to do well in the course. 

3. Competition is the keynote of the training. It is a 
lot of fun to mix it up with fellow cadets. 



4. From the standpoint of both quality and quantity 
we have nothing but praise for the daily menu here. 

5. Somewhere man may have devised a more difficult 
test of strength and endurance than our obstacle course, 
but you never could prove it by the cadets at Del 
Monte. 

6. When day is done and shadows fall you inevitably 
can find any cadet working at his desk preparing for 
the next day's classroom work. 



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43 




44 



Sports Writer Lauds Pre-FHght Organization For Work 
Accomplished In Correcting Mistakes Made During Years 

Of Modern Peace-Time Living 



BY FRANCIS J. POWERS 

Sports Writer, Chicago Daily News 



■ 



IN expressing my opinions of the 
U. S. Navy Pre-Flight program as 
formed at the school on the Uni- 
versity of Iowa campus and elsewhere 
I will be very frank. In its Pre-Flight 
program, the Navy has had to correct 
in twelve weeks the many mistakes 
■which have been made in years of 
peace time living. My observations 
deal with the program in its early 
stages. It is my understanding that the 
situation has been cleared up con- 
siderably in recent months since the 
inauguration of the Naval Flight Pre- 
paratory Schools and the War Train- 
ing Service Schools. In the period 
about which I am writing in this arti- 
cle, cadets came to pre-flight schools 
directly from civilian life. Recently, 
however, two new steps were added to 
the training, the Flight Preparatory 
Schools and the War Training Service 
Schools. Thus when the cadets arrive 
at pre-flight they already have been 
in the service and have taken physical 
training along with their other work 
for a period of about four months. As 
a result they are in good shape when 
they get in pre-flight training now. 

My report deals entirely with the 
early days of the Pre-flight program 
and I am recording herewith some of 
the observations which I made in the 
first year of the fine work conducted 
in the Pre-flight schools. 

When a new battalion arrives at the 
Pre-flight school you may, and often 
do, see a boy with so little coordina- 
tion he can't dribble a basketball 10 
feet. And you frequently see a couple 
of boys absolutely unable to swing on 
each other in the boxing ring. 

You see the same kids again after 
maybe four weeks. The kid with the 
basketball now can dribble the full 
length of the court and the two with 
boxing gloves are belting the thunder 
out of each other. You suddenly de- 
velop a lot of new pride in the Navy, 
not only for its ability to toughen 
these boys but because it had some of- 
ficers farsighted enough to develop 
the Pre-flight program. Maybe it was 
Capt. Radford or maybe it was Com- 



mander Tom Hamilton but whoever it 
was he contributed a lot to winning 
this war. 

In its Pre-flight program the Navy 
has done more than toughen fliers to 
fight the Axis, although that is its 
basic purpose. The Navy has devised 
and developed a training program that 
will be just as valuable to the country 
after this war is won. That is if we 
have learned the necessity of physical 
fitness and intend making it a real 
part of our educational systems. The 
Pre-flight program can be abridged 
and adapted for physical fitness pro- 




grams ranging from grammar schools 
to universities. 

Someone in the Navy was smart 
enough to know you can't toughen 
American boys with calisthenics and 
gymnastics alone. Competition is an 
inherent trait of the American boy and 
when you find one lacking it, there's 
someone to blame along the line. In 
the pre-flight schools a cadet is taught 
mental as well as physical combative- 
ness and it was remarkable how soft 
we had gone mentally. Just about as 
soft as some people who would throw 
out football and other contact sports. 
The Navy found football to be one of 
the best sports to develop both the 
body and mind to the job of winning 
in a game where there are no moral 
victories and the good loser is a dead 
one. The Navy also took the best from 
basketball, track, baseball, wrestling, 
boxing, etc. Each sport trained a dif- 



ferent set of muscles, each one gave 
the cadet a new medium for killing an 
enemy or saving his own life; which 
is just as important. 

The Naval Aviation Training au- 
thorities have found that Cadets learn 
quicker through competitive sports 
than regimented calisthenics. In com- 
petitive, contact games they develop 
fast mental reactions and the ability to 
think and act in situations that are 
not a part of any routine or found in 
any text book. Team games are best, 
for experience has proved many times 
in this war that team work is essen- 
tial to success in the air, 

I think the Pre-flight program is 
epitomized in the training for hand- 
to-hand fighting. There is nothing 
nice to hand-to-hand fighting. It's 
deadly and gruesome and its motive is 
to maim, incapacitate or kill an 
enemy. In perfecting the technique 
of hand-to-hand combat the Navy has 
gone to many sports: Boxing, wrest- 
ling, judo, football, soccer, track. It 
teaches a man to defend himself or 
attack only with his hands and feet. 
When a Cadet has gone through all 
the other routines of the program and 
has mastered the hand-to-hand combat 
he's as tough as a human being can 
become. Something the butchers of 
the Axis have learned in the one way 
they understand. 

The Pre-flight program has saved 
the lives of many American boys. It is 
training pilots who will fight and live. 
When a boy fails to pass the Pre- 
flight tests he may be saving his life 
as well as those who might be depend- 
ent upon him if he had gone on un- 
prepared. 

I have no patience with the critics 
of the Pre-Flight program. Its aim 
was to aid in the development of great 
fliers and it has succeeded. In addi- 
tion it has given us a physical training 
program that if utilized can avoid 
similar mental and physical softness 
in the future. Our shame is that we 
lived in such a manner as to make the 
Pre-flight program so necessary to the 
winning of the war. 



45 





<3 





Star-Gazers 



Sweet Is the Word 



1. This is a land of plenty. There is plenty of exercise, 
study, food, sleep, recreation, and good hard work, with 
particular accent on the last named. 

2. We build fields and help to maintain the physical 
appearance of our station. Medium of this work is the 
manual labor program, facetiously called "Engineering" 
by cadets. 



3. Throughout our work here, emphasis is on the practical 
aspects of the various activities. We learn how to come 
down a rope properly. 

4. We constantly are reminded that we are training to 
be officers as well as flyers, and that the drill field is 
a good place to develop qualities of leadership. 

5. At Pre-Flight we spend almost as much time in mili- 
tary and academic courses as in athletics. One of our 
most important subjects is celestial navigation. 

t. Even in a busy place like this we do find time for 
fun and frolic. 




47 



Writer Who Learned The Hard Way Puts 
Stamp Of Approval On Training At St. 
Mary's Pre-FUght School 



BY GEORGE T. DAVIS 

Sports Editor of The Los Angeles Evening Herald and Express 



THE fellow who tells you to join 
the Navy to get out of marching — 
well, just refer to any of the 191 
coaches, athletic directors and news- 
papermen who participated in a two- 
weeks' training course at the St. Mary's 
Navy Pre-Flight School during August, 
1942. 

How do I know? I was one of 'em, 
and my dogs still bark. 

Upon the invitation of Comdr. Tom 
Hamilton, daddy of the pre-flight 
schools; Lt. Comdr. Frank Wickhorst, 
now in charge of this excellent pro- 
gram ; and Lt. Comdr. Sam Barry, then 
athletic director at St. Mary's ; we 
lived the life of Navy air cadets for 
1 3 days. 

But those 13 days were among the 
luckiest of our lives as we acquired 
first-hand knowledge of the ground 
work given these cadets who are com- 
piling such remarkable records in the 
air in the war against tyranny. 

And we learned it the hard way — 
muster, march; muster, drill; muster, 
athletics; muster, muster, muster from 
0600 to 2130! Boy, were our dogs 
seaworthy? 

I'm afraid that we taxed the pa- 
tience of Capt. George \V. Steele, 
commanding officer ; and Comdr. Clyde 
King, executive officer; as we marched 
over the grounds at a cadence count 
that was a slow motion picture of those 
smart young cadets in their brisk steps. 

One Hundred Per Cent For Effort 

But we tried — and in so doing we 
learned to appreciate the effort that 
goes to building a Navy flier, and our 
old (and fallen) chests fill with pride 
over the accomplishments of these 
youths. 

"We were part of 'em, if only for 
two weeks," we oldsters boast. Bvit this 
is something of an over-statement. 

We did set up one record — Bill Cole, 
of Santa Ana ; Charley Hunter, of the 
Olympic Club ; and myself — that prob- 
ably never will be equalled at St. Mary's 



or any other pre-flight school, for that 
matter. 

It was the number of times we fell 
in the "drink" while trying to swing 
across a 26-foot ditch of water on the 
obstacle course. 

Oh. yes, we made some other records, 
too — snoring, eating and gold-bricking, 
to mention a few on the dubious side. 

But we had our athletes in the course 
also and could muster a football team 
— only on paper, mind you — that could 
have given Lt. Comdr. "Tex" Oliver's 
Airdevils composed of the Frankie 
Alberts. Vic Bottaris and Bobby Gray- 
sons plenty of argument if the calendar 
could have been turned back and aging 
muscles traded for youthful physiques. 

Our "paper team" from the men in 
our group included: 

Ends — Ike Frankian, St. Mary's; and 
George Canrinus, St. Mary's. 

Tackles — Harry Shipkey, Stanford ; 
and Chris Freeman, Stanford. 

Guards — "Babe" Horrell, Califor- 
nia; and Shelby Calhoun, Louisiana 
State. 

Center — Bob Herwig, California. 

Quarter — Bev. A. J. Dussault, Gon- 

zaga. 

Halfbacks — Elden Jenne, Washing- 
ton State; and Joe Verducci, California. 

Fullback — Bill Cole, Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

And if this team would need any 
coaching, we would have Mike Byan, 
Idaho mentor who was with the Amer- 
ican '08 Olympic team — with Ernie 
Cope, Bill Leiser and myself to serve 
as the Monday morning quarterbacks. 




Amos Alonzo Stagg Endorsed 
Training 

On the serious side, Amos Alonzo 
Stagg, octogenarian coach who still is 
active at the College of Pacific, visited 
us at St. Mary's and heartily endorsed 
the fitness program, declaring: 

"It's one of the finest things I've seen 
in all my years. My only regret is that 
I haven't been able to hold back the 
calendar so I wouldn't have to be on 
the outside." 

Then he glanced from the well- 
trimmed cadets to the 191 fallen-arch 
athletes who composed our group, and 
grinned : 

"Maybe I'm not too old, at that." 

And probably he was right. As we 
were marching to chow one day a new 
cadet, who just had come aboard, asked 
an older classmate: 

"Who are those old fellows?" 

And the reply was : 

"Oh, they've been here for 10 years 
but can't pass their physical." 

But there was plenty of construc- 
tive thought, as well as gags, in our 
gang and Verne S. Landrech, Califor- 
nia state physical education director 
who took the course at St. Mary's, used 
this pre-flight program as the basis for 
an all-out campaign for the school 
youngsters to coincide with the war ef- 
fort. 

As he put it : 

"The winning of the war may depend 
upon the boys now of junior high 
school age, and our job is to get them 
fit for this grim responsibility." 

All in all, it was a wonderful experi- 
ence for us and, when Capt. Steele gave 
us our diplomas at the end of our 
course, we were better men for having 
associated with the cadets in this great 
program. 

As each of us stepped forward to 
receive our certificates of 126 hours 
of indoctrination, the one paramount 
thought was: 

"I'm glad I'm an American." 



18 



U. S. NAVY PRE-FLIGHT SCHOOL 
ST. MARY'S COLLEGE. CALIFORNIA. 




1. Favorite phrase of our officers is "On the double." 
We hear it from dawn until after dusk as we move 
rapidly to each activity. 

2. Military track prepares us to extricate ourselves 
from tough spots. 

3. Serving as mate of the deck, we receive instructions 
from our battalion commander, Lt. (jg) Frank C. 
Albert. 



4. In boxing, we learn how to come back from a tough 
body blow. 

5. We head for San Francisco so that the Bay District 
folks may see how a St. Mary's "Tiger" looks in his 
dress blues. 

6. The scuttlebutt session is now in full swing as we 
listen to some solid tunes, read a magazine and talk 
ever the day's occupation. 



LETTER TO MY BROTHER'S 16 YEAR OLD SON 



Dear Louis: 

You ask if it's still true, what I wrote you over a year ago about winning the 
war. Boy, like most sports writers, I hesitate to examine anything I wrote that is 
13 weeks, let alone 13 months' old, but let's try. 

Remember you had asked a few questions, had left many unasked and had heard 
answers to practically none. In part, as I remember, I wrote you, 

"Unaccustomed to advising 15-year-old-men, I hesitated to make suggestions. Since 
you returned home, 1 have listened to the best informed men I know, I have esti- 
mated known facts as best I am able, and have come to certain conclusions I do not 
at all like. 

"I am merely a sports editor; I have no military information; I am not any 
part of a war analyst. Nevertheless, it seems as definite as the probability that 
Joe Louis will win his next fight that— 

"Men of your age, 15 years and younger, will have to win this war, if older men 
do not lose it for you before you are ready to take over and carry the load. 

"This isn't a frightening prospect, though it's a grim one. 

"This, I'm afraid, is going to be your first great job in life. You didn't ask for 
it. You inherited it, and it's yours, that's all. 

"I hear older persons like myself talking about saving 'our way of life' for 
our children. I don't think they can do it. It's the children, if we insist on 
calling 15-year-old men children, who will save the 'American way' for everyone. 

"That's going to be your major job. . . . Since it's going to be your job, your 
major purpose today must be to prepare yourself for it, to prepare to live, not to 
die, in fighting it out, to prepare to win this war which is going to fall squarely 
upon your now young shoulders." 

And now, Louis, you ask if this is still true. 

Yes, boy, from your point of view, it still is true. 

Today, the Army and Navy are depending more and more on 18-year-old men. These 
men were 17 years old when I wrote you a year ago. Today you are 16. You're not far 
removed, right now, from the toughest and grimmest job in life, war; and the 
greatest effort you and men of your age can make for yourself and your country is to 
prepare, even more thoroughly for it. 

How? 

The answer is exactly what is was a year ago. 

We talked about improving your speed for football and basketball by running that 
last quarter mile on the way home, each day, from the Washington School to the old 
Booth home, and sprinting the last 50 yards. In six months that will gain a half 
step for you in your speed to first base. To improve your "skills" in baseball and 
football is to improve the same "skills" used to advantage in war combat, as the 
Navy has determined and emphasized in all of its pre-f light schools. 

Improve your speed and learn all you can about combat sports, but that isn't 
enough . 

It is necessary for 16-year-old men to become strong swimmers. You do swim. 
But, you must continue to improve, to learn how to swim with a good weight on your 
back, how to stay afloat a long time, how to care for a comrade who has been so un- 
fortunate as to attend a school or live in a community in which boys don't learn 
how. 

I know a flyer from Concord who was down three times in the Indian Ocean. He 
could swim well. That's why, though three of his planes were licked, he's back 
flying today and knocking Japs out of the skies. Major Joe Foss, the great combat 



50 



ace of the South Pacific, was shot down on a dark night. He told me that if he 
hadn't known just a little about swimming, he'd have drowned then and there, alone. 
He didn't. If he hadn't known a little about the water he would be dead today, and 
many dead Japs would be alive and would be killing American boys. 

Now, Louis, I don't mean that you should spend all of your time or even the most 
of your time right now thinking about this job you have coming up. 

Surely you should go to dances, pick the raspberries, enjoy high school and play 
the games you like. 

But, take enough time to be sure you are on the track that leads to where you 
are going. 

Fortunately, for yourself, you now have your own fitness program of basketball, 
baseball, and football and swimming. But, for your friends, does your high school 
have a general fitness program? 

Surely, Army and Navy devote weeks to toughening up boys after they enter the 
service. But they can't do one tenth the job in the time they have for boys of 18 
and over that boys can do for themselves, with reasonable help, while they are 15, 
16, and 17. 

You say your school has a good sports games program, and you're in it pretty much 
the year around. O.K., now, for you. But, the boys not in that program are getting 
an unforgivably bad break, and some of them are your best friends. Without a com- 
plete program including all boys, it is failing. 

The main job of the United States is to win the war. Many factors still indicate 
that this job is going to be the task of 16 and 17-year-olds. If your school is not 
providing the 16 and 17-year-olds the most important training for this war job, 
then your school is just not doing its own job. Your school is failing your young 
friends and your country. 

The Navy will help your school prepare a program including all boys in it. The 
Army will help. The Navy had nearly 200 men from public schools at St. Mary's Pre- 
Flight a year ago, and all of them are now teaching carefully planned programs that 
will fit your school and give all of your 16-year-old friends a fighting chance. 
Your school can have the program, and there's no reason why you shouldn't have 
benefit of all of it along with games experience. 

I think you are already on the beam, Louis. Get your young friends on it, as far 
as you are able. Get a complete fitness program in that Twin Falls High School of 
yours, if you can, for your own good. 

It is extremely IMPORTANT to all of you to acquire now, in the years immediately 
before you are 18, advantages which you never again will be able to attain. 

As we said last year, Louis, once you and Dad and Mom have done all you can to 
set up the best program possible, then you forget the war for another year. Hit 
everything hard, and have all the fun you can both working and playing. Is IS fun 
to do work well, just as it is to play hard and win. Do both, and the rest, for the 
time being, will take care of itself, while you will be ready to take care of the 
rest when the time comes. 

One great pilot with a fabulous record said to me, "Strong, sound physical condi- 
tion is the implement to any purpose of mind. Boys of today who study hard and grow 
strong and know themselves will soon find revealed to them a world exciting beyond 
their wildest imagination." 

Good night, Louis. I may be wrong, pray to God that I am wrong about the length 
of the war, about just who will carry the ball from the 50 yard line on to the goal; 
but if I turn out to be wrong about that, I know I am still right about you. 

Sincerely, 

Uncle Bill. 



{pom BILL LEISER, 



51 



(Upper left) Cadets at Ottumwa, Iowa, looking over the flight orders for the first period. Some 
of the cadets are ready to go, with parachutes already buckled on. (Upper right) Training 
planes flying in formalion form a pretty picture in the clouds as this photograph serves to indi- 
cate. (Top inset) Gymnastics and tumbling are designed to make cadets feel at home when in 
an upside down position. This scene is at U.S.N.A.S., Glenview, III. (Center inset) Cadets take 
notes on a Navigation problem in Ground School at the Naval Air Station, Glenview, III. 

PRIMARY TRAINING 

PRIMARY training is the fourth phase in the Navy's training program which is 
today producing pilots able to meet the world's best on better than even terms. 
It is at the Primary Base that the cadet really tries his wings in a Navy train- 
ing ship. No matter how far he goes in the field of war and subsequent peace time 
aviation, the pilot will never forget that momentous day when he climbed alone into 
his rugged Navy trainer for his solo flight. Hours of flight with a skilled instructor 
and hours of ground school had gone into that Navy solo and had paid dividends. 



Chief of the Naval Air Primary Training Command is Rear Admiral Elliott Buck- 
master, USN. With headquarters in Kansas City. Admiral Buckmaster has in his command the 
Naval Flight Preparatory Schools, the C.A.A.-War Training Service Schools, the Pre-Flight 
Schools, the Regional Offices and the Primary Air Stations. (Picture appears in center of 
Primary Air Training Photomontage.) 



Days pass rapidly for the budding flyer and his progress is steady. 

Hours upon end he has wheeled over a white stone circle in fields surrounding 
the air station, coming in to touch his landing gear and taking off again to repeat 
the cycle. Thus does he acquire the sense of distance which will one day enable 
him to "set her down" on a flat top without error. He does wing overs, figure eights 
and other aerial acrobatics which teach him the elements of maneuvering for combat. 
(His night flights give him the chance to practice landing and taking off at night.) 

While this phase of the Navy's "learn by doing" program moves ahead, the cadet 
is not neglecting other essentials. In the class room, or ground school he pores over 
texts on navigation, power plant, aerology and other kindred subjects he will need to 
know before he is a competent flyer. His course in recognition teaches him to 
instantly recognize any air or surface craft of friend or foe without hesitation. 

Nor has he neglected the physique God gave him and which received such a 
thorough conditioning at Flight Preparatory, War Training Service and Pre-Flight — 
his first three stages of training. He is proud of that body and the newly acquired 
athletic skills and works daily under expert supervision to further improve it. 

Such is the Primary life of a Cadet. He is still not a fully trained flyer when he 
ships out for more advanced training, but he is still a lot of pilot in anybody's ship. 
An integral part of the broad training program which is producing pilots who are 
already bringing swift retribution to the Axis strongholds in Europe and the South 
Pacific. 

(Lower inset) The old "down to the sea in ships" still holds good in the Navy, but the aviation 
pilots have their own version with their "up in the clouds in ships" to do their part. (Lower 
left) Cadets at Ottumwa, Iowa "stole the show" at the general inspection held recently. The 
cadets are pictured here at "attention" with the inspecting party moving down the lines. (Lower 
right) Aviation cadet V. E. Hansel ready to take off in N2S-3 at Memphis Naval Air Station. 



PRIMARY AIR TRAINING 




1. We spend long hours in the study of navigation. 

2. Whether we be called "obstaclers" or aviation 
cadets, the fact remains that it is a long weary road 
on the obstacle course. 

3. This picture was taken just before I made my solo 
hop. I was filled with questions as I checked every- 
thing carefully before taking off on the most mo- 
mentous ride or my flying career. 



4. Thousands of others had soloed before me, but the 
realization of this fact has not prevented me from 
recalling minutely the detarls of that great day. 

5. Flying finished, a game of pool helps us to relax 
a bit. 

£. We enjoy our liberty night. The social lions really 
roar once they don their blues. 




Scene on patrol in the Atlantic with "K" ship over convoy. 



"K" ships fly in weather that grounds most aircraft. Scene last winter as ship 
returns home from patrol. 



LIGHTER THAN-A1R TRAINING 



PILOT training in lighter-than-air is being 
conducted on the East Coast at Lakehurst, 
N. J., and on the West Coast at Moffett Field, 
California. 



Chief of Naval Airship Training Command is 
Rear Admiral Charles E. Rosendahl, USN. (Pic- 
tured in center of photomontage speaking to 
graduating class.) Pilot training at Lakehurst 
and at Moffett Field is under his direction. 



Graduates of Navy Pre-Flight Schools who 
applied for lighter-than-air and have quali- 
fied are sent to one of these training centers. 
The Primary and Advanced Training courses 
now being taught have been lengthened, each 
now taking three months. 

Primary ground school instruction covers 
courses in Aerodynamics, aerostatics, airman- 
ship, balloons and gases, communications, 
design and maintenance, mooring and dock- 
ing, navigation, ordnance, photography, power, 
plants and strategy-tactics and missions. 

Primary flying is given in small "L" type 
training ships which have a capacity of 123,- 
000 cubic feet of helium and are 150 feet long. 
Three to six cadets are usually carried in these 
training flights along with the instructor and 
enlisted mechanic. 
Flights last from 
three to five hours 
depending upon the 
stage of training 
and each cadet has 
his turn at the 
controls. 




Free ballooning is one of the most in- 
teresting parts of the Primary course. An 
airship with both engines dead can be flown 
exactly in the same manner as a free balloon. 
These training balloons are generally of the 
35,000 cubic foot size, and carry an instructor 
and five or six cadets in each flight. 

Upon successfully completing primary 
training the student is then moved to the 
advanced course which covers flight in the 
"K" type patrol ships. During the flight train- 
ing the cadet is given the required number 
of hours at vital positions in the ship. Thus 
every airship pilot has a complete working 
knowledge of the duties of every man aboard 
and is qualified to do every job. 

Advanced ground school courses are given 
in leadership, communications, ordnance, 
navigation, squadron organization, ship rec- 
ognition, engineering and aerology. 

During the six months of Primary and 
Advanced training all cadets are given rigid 
athletic training that builds their physical 
strength to the high standards set by the 
Navy. Drilling also has its place on the daily 
schedule. i 

Cadets who successfully complete all flight 
and ground courses are commissioned as 
ensigns and designated Naval Aviators (Air- 
ship), after which they are assigned to opera- 
ting squadrons for anti-submarine duty in 
the Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf of Mexico and out- 
side the Continental limits of the United 
States. 



(Inset) Transformation. The cadet hat is removed for the last time and in its place 
goes the Officer's cap. His training completed, the cadet is now an Ensign in the 
Naval Reserve. 

Rear Admiral Charles E. Rosendahl inspects graduating class at Lakehurst prior 
to ceremonies of commissioning and designation as Naval Aviators (airship). Those 
without wings are honor graduates who will receive their wings from the Admiral. 




View of ground crew as "L" type trainer comes in for 
practice landing. 




Emergency food and medical supplies being lowered_ from 
"K" ship to survivors of a torpedoed merchant ship in the 
Atlantic. Blimp called for surface craft which came to the 
scene and took survivors to port. 




LIGHTER-THAN-AIR-TRAINING 




1. It is the day tor our hop in a free balloon and final 
word on the wind is being given to our pilot by the 
ground handling officer. 

2. We have taken over the duties of a AMMI/c as we 
sit behind the mech panel. 

3. Our charts and the implements for calculating maps 
simplify the problems of navigation. 



4. We keep our eyes glued to the sea for any trace of 
enemy subs. 

5. Some call it coffee. Some call it Joe, but we all 
enjoy it. 

6. We learn how to handle the rudder and once you 
get the knack of it, it comes without difficulty. 

7. The blinker is used for communications with surface 
facilities when in convoy. Old chiefs furnish uc the 
instruction. 




INTERMEDIATE TRAINING 



HAVING completed primary training at 
any one of thirteen stations located 
from coast to coast, Naval aviation cadets 
then go to either Pensacola, Florida, or 
Corpus Christi, Texas for their intermediate 
training. The function of the Naval Air 
Intermediate Training Command and of the 
Pensacola and Corpus Christi centers, is to 
give training leading to commissioning and 
the award of wings under the cadet train- 
ing program. Since the cadets earn the 
wings of gold at Pensacola or Corpus 
Christi, it can be seen readily that the sta- 
tion at which they take their intermediate 
training will live for many years in the mind 
of all aviation cadets. 



Commandant of the Naval Air Training 
Center, Pensacola and Chief of Naval Air 
Intermediate Training is Rear Admiral George 
D. Murray (pictured in center of photomon- 
tage), a veteran of 36 years in the Navy, 2? 
of them in Naval aviation. 



There are two distinct phases in the pro- 
gram of an aviation cadet at the training 
center: that which teaches him to fly and 
that which prepares him to discharge the 
duties of an officer. 

Basic training for cadets at either Pen- 
sacola or Corpus Christi includes their first 
contact with heavier planes, formation 
flights, acrobatics and long intensive hours 
of practicing landings and take-offs from 
one of the many small fields in the vicinity 
of the main stations. 

Next step is instrument training which 
receives particular stress in the Navy. Cadets 
spend many hours in Link Trainers and 
under the hood of training planes, preparing 
for the day when they may be finding their 
way back to a carrier steaming somewhere 
in the middle of the Pacific. 

When basic and instrument training are 
completed, cadets are assigned to one of 
five types of advanced training. These in- 
clude (1) long range patrol bombers; (2) 
observation scouts; (3) fighters; (4) dive 
bombers and (5) torpedo bombers. 

At impressive graduation ceremonies 
cadets receive their designations as Naval 
aviators and commissions in the Naval Re- 
serve or the Marine Corps reserve. Some 
of the graduates are sent to advanced bases 
for further transitional training while others 
are retained as instructors. 



Below — Rear Admiral Charles P. Mason, USN, 
commandant of the Naval Air Training Center, 
Corpus Christi, Texas, receives a snappy salute 
from newly-commissioned Ensign Paul J. Ward of 
Marysville, Missouri, who has just received his 
wings of gold at graduation exercises. 



Top — Graduation is a big day as 
Naval Aviation Cadets are commis- 
sioned as officers in the Naval Re- 
serve or the Marine Corps Reserve 
upon successful completion of inter- 
mediate training. 

Center — The aero wheel is popular 
with cadets throughout the training 
program. It helps trainees to develop 
the natural sense of balance. 

Bottom— An H. P. (hot pilot) serves 
a hot dog to his drag at a station 
dance. There is recreation for all and 
pretty girls always help to brighten 
the picture. 





INTERMEDIATE AIR TRAINING 



Practice Makes Perfect 




1. No matter how often you step into the cockpit, it 
does not seem to get monotonous. 

2. There is a touch of the old West in this photograph, 
snapped when come of my ship-mates went to visit at 
a nearby ranch. 

3. That is Lt. Colonel R. C. Mangrum of the Marine 
Corps. He is Officer-in-charge of the cadet regiment. 
The cadet with him is Dennis E. Byrd. They had met 
before, for it was their plane that was the first to land 



on Henderson Field at Guadalcanal, where Byrd was 
gunner for Colonel Mangrum. 

4. We spend a lot of time in ground school studies, in 
physical training and on the drill field. 

5. We work in a synthetic device which is built on the 
ground for training purposes. 

t. A cadet no longer — now a commissioned officer in 
the United States Marine Corps — I have just received 
my wings of gold and my commission. 




I iwff "» m iBWWIHMiBinH \ 
ii^friiimiiiii n ^ 






* > 



OPERATIONAL 
TRAINING 

"DECAUSE of its nature, operational air training 
in time of war does not lend itself readily as a 
source of material for public consumption, either 
written or pictorial. The story behind operations 
and the tale of the results of the training would 
make interesting reading, but it must be restricted 
because any knowledge of the type of training which 
is being given to Naval and Marine Corps student 
officers would be of considerable value to the enemy. 

Under the cognizance of NAOPTC come several 
activities, each of which handles its own type of 
specialized training. Most of the training is con- 
ducted in the state of Florida. Each station has a 
particular mission to perform, and the combination 
of the various objectives adds up to the overall pur- 
pose of Naval Air Operational Training. 

Students in Operational Training are newly 
designated Naval Aviators who (having just com- 
pleted their intermediate training at Pensacola or 
Corpus Christi) have earned their wings of gold 




Cadets learn effects of fly- 
ing at high altitudes. 




and are now commissioned officers in the Naval 
Reserve or the Marine Corps Reserve. 

Before entering operational training, aviation 
cadets learned how to fly as individuals, but now 
the emphasis is placed on teaching the student- 
officers to perform as members of a team. They not 
only perfect their own asignments but also learn 
what their squadron mates must do and how the 
work of all hands must be dovetailed in order to 



The Naval Air Operational Training Com- 
mand is responsible for the operational instruc- 
tion of naval aviators. Headquarters is in Jack- 
sonville, Florida. Rear Admiral Andrew Calhoun 
McFall, USN (pictured in center of photomon- 
tage) is Chief of NAOPTC. 



Student officers learn how to 
fly the "hot" models they 
will later use in combat. 



accomplish a mission. Training is conducted in 
six types of planes; fighters, dive bombers, torpedo, 
patrol, twin engine land plane bombers and ship 
based scout bombers. 

In all cases actual battle conditions are simulated 
and are made to be as close as possible to latest 
operations against the enemy. 




A group of recent graduates of the Naval Academy 
watches with interest as a plane is about to be catapulted 
at the Naval Air Station at Jacksonville, Florida. 



Lt. Cmdr. Fred "Bun" Borries of Navy grid 
fame, and veteran of the Coral Sea cam- 
paign is now an instructor at Lee Field. 



Swimming is an important part of the physical training pro- 
gram for student officers. Here, the recently commissioned 
officers use their shirts to serve as life buoys. 




FIGURES BEFORE RIVETS 

It takes figuring to equip fighting men — to 
keep supplies rolling to the front. Quick, ac- 
curate figuring narrows the time gap between 
plans and production. Victor adding machines 
are supplying those split-second answers in all 
phases of the war effort. 

In addition, Victor is also manufacturing vitally 
needed, precisely machined war instruments in 
ever-increasing volume. 



VICTOR ADDING MACHINE CO. 



Wherever aircraft and aircraft parts 
are built, you are almost certain 
to find MARVEL SAWS cutting 
the tough alloy steels because 
MARVEL SAWS do the job 
FASTER. 

ARMSTRONG-BLUM 
MFG. CO. 

"THE HACK SAW PEOPLE" 
CHICAGO, ILL. 





"--/'/ ain't the in- 
dividual nor the 
army as a whole, 
but the everlast- 
in' teamwork of 
every bloomin' 
soul ". 

Rudyard Kipling 



RIGHT, Mr. Kipling! Drawing a 
bead on a Jap is the end product 
of America's production fighters. 
Back of flyers at controls and bomb 
triggers, is the teamworkof thousands 
of men and women working to give 
Uncle Sam more planes fasterl 

Day and night, seven days a week, 
doing the little intricate things 
needed to build great fighting ships, 
ROHR workers put an intensity 
into their job that the slave battal- 
ions of Europe can never match! 




AIRCRAFT 

CORPORATION 

PARTS ★ ASSEMBLIES 
CHULA VISTA, CALIFORNIA 




63 



OPERATIONAL AIR TRAINING 





1. We constantly study models of ships and planes in 
our recognition classes. 

2. Each flight is a new and interesting experience. 

3. Another flight completed, we are nearing the end 
of our training and will soon move out into the fleet. 



4. We talk over the situation just before going out to 
the line. 

5. Our activities at the field over for the day, we step 
out for some recreation. 




Wherever 
Dependable Power 
Counts 

In Pan American Airway's 
"million mile" Clippers where 
unfailing performance is essen- 
tial, Auto-Lite Batteries have 
long been standard equipment. 
Built and backed by the world's 
largest independent manufac- 
turers of automotive electrical 
equipment, Auto-Lite Batteries 
are also serving with our fight- 
ing forces and in mil- 
lions of cars, trucks, 
and buses on the home — ___ 
front as well. — v — 

AUTO-LITE BATTERY CORPORATION 

TOLEDO, 1, OHIO 

in Its 26 Great Manufacturing Divisions, Auto-Lite Is Produc- 
ing tor America's Armed Forces on Land, Sea and in the Air 



We are proud of the fact that we have been called upon 
by the U. S. Navy to make officers uniforms. We are 
happy to serve in this manner to the limits of our 
capacity. 

M. BORN & CO. 

CHICAGO. ILL. 
CUSTOM TAILORS SINCE 1876 



THE WINGED INGOT is a symbol of free- 
dom. It is a graphic expression of Dow's 
recovery of magnesium, lightest of the 
light metals, from sea water to release our 
airplanes from hampering weight. 

Also, it is a symbol of things to come. 
When peace returns the freedom of 



American enterprise will permit the full 
use of Dow's vast magnesium production 
to speed transportation of passengers and 
freight by air and lighten tasks in indus- 
try, business and the home. 

Millions of pounds of Dow magnesium, 
extracted from the inexhaustible sources 



THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY, MIDLAND, MICHIGAN 

New York — St. Louis — Chicago — Houston — San Francisco — Los Angeles — Seattle 

GNESIUM 




of the sea and from Michigan brine — as 
well as Dow facilities already established 
for the fabrication of Dowmetal castings 
and wrought products — will then be avail- 
able to give this symbol of freedom — the 
flying ingot — its fullest significance. 



PRODUCER SINCE 1916 



Dow 



CHEMICALS INDISPENSABLE 
TO INDUSTRY AND VICTORY 



HHffiH